dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Discussions

dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar scribe » Jeu 14 Juil 2011 18:51

Jean-Luc Godard has a solution to Europe's financial crisis. It's as simple and ingenious as one would expect from the man who, with all the young guns of the Nouvelle Vague, freed cinema from its studio straitjacket in the 1960s. "The Greeks gave us logic. We owe them for that. It was Aristotle who came up with the big 'therefore'. As in, 'You don't love me any more, therefore . . . ' Or, 'I found you in bed with another man, therefore . . . ' We use this word millions of times, to make our most important decisions. It's about time we started paying for it.

"If every time we use the word therefore, we have to pay 10 euros to Greece, the crisis will be over in one day, and the Greeks will not have to sell the Parthenon to the Germans. We have the technology to track down all those therefores on Google. We can even bill people by iPhone. Every time Angela Merkel tells the Greeks we lent you all this money, therefore you must pay us back with interest, she must therefore first pay them their royalties."

He laughs, I laugh, someone listening in the next room laughs. Godard is, of course, against the whole bourgeois capitalist concept of copyright: he gives it the finger in a none-too-subtle gag at the end of Film Socialisme, the latest salvo in his 40-year war against Hollywood, released last week. Cinema's enfant terrible may be 80, but he's lost none of his genius for contrarian cheek.

Film Socialisme is vintage late-Godard in all its baffling glory: a numbing assault on the eyes, brain and the buttocks, that takes liberties with your patience and mental endurance, but has an undeniable originality. There is no story of course, heavens no. Instead, we are at sea on a cacophonous Mediterranean cruise ship, a floating Las Vegas drowning in over-consumption, where a Greek chorus of actors and philosophers wander among the middle-aged passengers quoting Bismarck, Beckett, Derrida, Conrad and Goethe in French, German, Russian and Arabic.

It's not an easy watch. The will to live frequently slips away as images of the last tortured century pass before our eyes – only to be revived again by Godard's sublime shots of the ship and the sea, or some random quotation that hits its mark. "To be right, to be 20, to keep hope," we hear as Patti Smith wanders the decks with her guitar, like a sullen teenager. So is this the future of film, as Godard's supporters claim? I'm not sure. All I know is that no one else makes films like this. And what other major director would put the whole thing on YouTube, albeit playing at lightning speed, the day before it was released?

A man eaten by his own myth

Godard's diehard disciples see it not just as a metaphor for Europe – a ship of aging malcontents adrift in their own history – but as a manifesto for a "new republic of images", free from the dead hand of corporate ownership and intellectual property laws. This new cinema will be cut and pasted together in a world beyond copyright, where droit d'auteur will soon seem as medieval as droit du seigneur. Until now, Godard has shed little light on his creation, having gone awol just as the film was premiered at Cannes this year, leaving only the message: "Because of Greek-style problems, I cannot oblige you at Cannes. I would go to the death for the festival, but not a step further."

This is the kind of cartoon Godard we are familiar with, the Godard of the grand gesture, the Godard who has been a stock character of intellectual jokes ever since he veered off into Maoist obscurantism after rewriting the rules of cinema in the early 1960s with films like A Bout de Souffle (Breathless). Egged on by Raoul Coutard, his brilliant director of photography, he shot on the fly with handheld cameras and no script to speak of, opening the way not just for the French New Wave but a whole generation of independent directors the world over. Scorsese, Tarantino, Altman, Fassbinder, De Palma, Soderbergh, Jarmusch, Paul Thomas Anderson – in one way or another, they and countless others modelled themselves on this enigmatic Swiss director with an inexhaustible line in snappy aphorisms that will keep film theorists in work for centuries: "Photography is truth. The cinema is truth 24 times per second"; "A story should have a beginning, a middle and an end, but not necessarily in that order."

Somewhere along the way, though, the man appears to have been eaten by the myth. The Godard sitting before me in a Paris flat, wearing a T-shirt so tight it gives him the air of a bristly, bespectacled Buddha awoken from his afternoon nap, is so much more human, so much more childlike than the legend. He has a slight lisp. He is playful and patient. He tries to answer questions others might take as insults. He makes sense, mostly. It is hard to see him as "the shit" fellow New Wave director François Truffaut fell out with in the 1970s.

He is even nice about Hollywood, or at least the Hollywood of the 1930s-1950s, "that could make films like no one else could. Now even the Norwegians can make films as bad as the Americans." He raves about the non-narrative form of westerns. "All you know is that a stranger rides into town." I ask about the pressure of being seen as the auteur's auteur, a permanent visionary. "I am not an auteur, well, not now anyway," he says as casually, as if it was like giving up smoking. "We once believed we were auteurs but we weren't. We had no idea, really. Film is over. It's sad nobody is really exploring it. But what to do? And anyway, with mobile phones and everything, everyone is now an auteur."

Godard rarely gives interviews and often cancels them. For more than 30 years, he has tried to find a new language of film, locking himself away in his garage in the dull Swiss town of Rolle. A French philosopher told me he once spent a week waiting in vain outside his house for an audience. I ask about the significance of the llama and the donkey in Film Socialisme, which have prompted much chin-stroking among critics. "The truth is that they were in the field next to the petrol station in Switzerland where we shot the sequence. Voilà. No mystery. I use what I find." He says people often find meaning in his films that are not there. I begin to wonder if Godard has been greatly misunderstood: is he in fact much simpler than he seems?

"People never ask the right questions," he says. "My answer to the person who will never ask me the right question about this film is that the image I really like is the one about Palestine, the trapeze artists." This is a metaphor for the beauty that will be born the day Jews and Arabs learn to work together.

We are edging towards the prickly subject of Godard's alleged antisemitism, a subject that reared its head again last year when he got an honorary Oscar. His hostility to Israel and strong support for the Palestinian cause has often been conflated with a hatred of Jews, a claim he says is "idiotic". The philosopher Bernard Henri-Lévy, who worked with him on a number of aborted projects about "the Jewish being", once called him a man "trying to cure himself of his antisemitism". This may or may not come from his upper-class Swiss-French family, many of whom were sympathetic to Vichy. In Film Socialisme, he again puts his hand in the wasps' nest with such lines as: "How strange that Hollywood should be invented by the Jews."

The existential Lassie

Another book accusing him of antisemitism appeared a few weeks ago by the intellectual Alain Fleischer. Fleischer defines an antisemite as anyone opposed to Israel's existence; he admits, however, that Godard was an antisemite only in so much as "a Jew can sometimes be". I try to goad him into a reply but he is having none of it. "It makes me sad. He says the man has said this, but the man and the work are very different things." I ask if that means the man may be antisemitic but the work is not, but Godard waves his hands. "No, no! It's all ridiculous."

I make to leave, asking what he's doing next, and he jumps up like a teenager and goes rummaging in the next room, returning with a script. "Take it," Godard says, dedicating it to "the guardian of cinematography", for some reason thinking I may be able to help get it made. I'm touched, but deeply saddened that a great pioneer of cinema is having to huckster like this.

Or is he? Is he, at 80, just getting it out there – like putting his film on YouTube? As I walk down the Boulevard Magenta, I wonder if I should make it myself, since copyright and the idea of the auteur no longer mean anything to Godard. It's called Adieu to Language, which it very much is. It's about a couple and a dog, and life and death and everything else, though the dog is the real star. Yes, maybe I should make it. But is the world ready yet for Lassie: One Dog's Quest for Purpose in an Existential Universe? Or, crazier still, a Godard film with a happy ending?


http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/jul/12/jean-luc-godard-film-socialisme?CMP=twt_gu
scribe
 

Re: dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar weightwatchers » Jeu 14 Juil 2011 22:11

scribe a écrit:He raves about the non-narrative form of westerns. "All you know is that a stranger rides into town."


estce vraiment le cas dans les westerns récents ?a voir
weightwatchers
 

Re: dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar goeast » Ven 15 Juil 2011 14:13

Ouais, ce constat n'a rien d'évident. On a l'impression qu'il parle là des vieux films de Clint des années 70-80..mais bon, sa réponse est dans la tonalité du reste, il dit quelques mots parce qu'il faut bien dire quelques chose (à moins de s'appeler Ford, lol).. c'est encore sur la question de la Grèce qu'il est le plus "inspiré", plutôt que sur le cinéma dont il semble vraiment avoir fait le deuil. Sur les westerns, il aurait mieux fait de dire qu'il regrettait les westerns Aristoto-brechtiens d'A. Mann ! ;o)

Le fameux texte de Godard sur L'homme de l'Ouest, peut-être pour mieux comprendre ce que Godard peut reprocher aux westerns d'aujourd'hui derrière la formule à l'emporte-pièce ??!

Le western, genre dont on prévoyait la fin dans les années 90, est d'ailleurs en plein essor actuellement, nombre d'auteurs cherchent aujourd'hui à apporter leur contribution au genre (Harris, les Coen il y a peu, bientôt Tarantino, Bahrani...). Chacun essaye d'apporter une nouvelle touche au genre, quelque part c'est sans doute comparable au wu xia pian en Chine (je pense notamment à Jia Zhang Ke qui s'y colle lui-aussi..), avec ce que ça peut contenir de feu et de contre-feu idéologique. Et puis, de Sissako à Ameur-Zaimeche en passant par Amaouche, pas mal de cinéastes rendent encore hommage au western dans leurs films.

Aussi puant soit-il (la raison du plus fort), on peut pas trop reprocher au dernier film des Coen d'être "non narratif" par exemple, même si le film joue là-dessus sur le même plan que le reste, avec cynisme (retournant les codes de la fameuse fable). Et puis il s'inscrit en plein dans le cinéma du baratin initié par Tarantino, nulle aridité sur qui vient d'où, qui a fait quoi, au contraire c'est (comme tout) sujet de discussions interminables. On est loin des personnages monolithiques des décennies passées.
goeast
 

Re: dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar Borges » Sam 30 Juil 2011 01:22

A propos de western et du dernier KR, je conseille mon excellente intervention chez les spectres, qui fera date of course :

deux, c’est assez pour rendre la communication, sinon impossible, du moins complexe.

;)
Borges
 

Re: dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar goeast » Sam 17 Sep 2011 15:06

Hier soir, j'ai regardé un western de Sirk, Taza, son of Cochise (1954). Je dois avouer que j'avais téléchargé ça un peu par perversion parce que je sentais le truc nauséabond à l'avance, ayant déjà été passablement écoeuré par l'idéologie de Imitation of life.

étrange mélo réalisé de main de maître qui fonctionne essentiellement sur du "deux". La communauté noire semble avoir le choix entre rester sagement à sa place (la mère, Annie) ou se rebeller contre sa condition mais avec l'arrière-pensée schizophrénique d'un devenir blanc (la fille, Sarah Jane). Ce qu'il manque entre les deux, entre le fait d'assumer ses origines pour mieux rester esclave de sa condition et le refus de les assumer en retombant toujours dans le mensonge (autre forme d'esclavage) : l'affirmation positive d'être noir, la revendication émancipatrice du fameux "black is beautiful" des années 60. Un mélo probable miroir des années 50, mais qui ne semble donc pas très en avance sur son temps (1959).


ben, dans un sens, j'ai pas été déçu. Dès le début, quelques plans folkloriques avec des indiens costumés et d'un seul coup le premier plan avec les personnages principaux qui parlent : Rock Hudson, Rex Reason, Barbara Rush barbouillés de maquillage.. un truc classique mais ça faisait tellement de temps que je n'avais pas vu un western us avec des "indiens" que cette pantalonnade m'a dégoûté. Je suis quand même allé plus ou moins jusqu'au bout de ce film qui rappelle avec insistance qu'un bon indien est un indien qui collabore. Affligeant, mais instructif sur l'organisation d'un camps (réserve), d'une colonie.

Je crois que le film m'a vacciné pour un moment du western, je veux encore regarder Broken Arrow de Dave (plus ou moins le prequel de Taza, si j'ai bien compris), après...
goeast
 

Re: dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar JM » Dim 18 Sep 2011 10:42

Salut goast,

Tu vas voir, le film de Delmer Daves est, disons, pas ce qui peut se faire de pire en matière de western avec des Indiens.. en effet, le film se passe juste avant celui de Sirk puisque au début de celui-ci, si je me souviens bien, Cochise meurt et il s'agit de maintenir la paix trouvée de son vivant évoquée dans Broken Arrow. Il n'en reste pas moins que tout cela a le goût d'un hymne au renoncement, à l'adaptation au pis-aller proposé par les blancs. Evidemment c'est encore l'histoire d'un homme blanc qui se marie avec une petite "indienne" (Debra Paget), et comme on est pas chez Fassbinder, elle doit mourir à la fin. Et, bien sûr, comme s'en excusent Stewart et Daves en début de film, la seule différence avec la réalité, ça sera que les Indiens parlent ici (comme dans la majorité des westerns en fait, on se demande pourquoi Daves ajoute cela, c'est soit très naïf, soit très hypocrite) l'américain. Cette excuse qui ouvre le film dit surtout que Daves, malgré ses efforts pour dépeindre l'ouverture culturelle du personnage de Stewart dans le film, ne comprend absolument rien de ce qui se joue dans son film.



Bon, moi je me pose depuis un certain temps la question de savoir s'il était pertinent de la part de Malick de mettre dans la bouche de sa Pocahontas des vers arrangés d'Hölderlin. Il est des emprunts qui méritent d'être accueillis dans le doute et l'incertitude (et avec tout le respect que j'ai pour sa très grande érudition lol).. Je crois que c'est une question assez difficile, il faut que je me mette dans le livre d'Heidegger, "les hymnes de Hölderlin", entre autre.



Godard, lui, faisait réciter un poème de Darwich (dans lequel il se mettait dans la peau des colonisés) aux Indiens de Notre Musique, "The Speech of the Red Indian" (pas trouvé de vidéo sur le net, j'aurais bien aimé), tout en donnant la parole à Darwich ailleurs sur la fonction du poète.

JM
 

Re: dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar EL » Dim 18 Sep 2011 19:46

Je ne peux pas répondre à ta question mais à propos de Paget sur wikipédia :

In 1987, the Motion Picture & Television Fund presented Paget with its Golden Boot Award. This award is presented to actors, writers, directors and stunt crew who "have contributed so much to the development and preservation of the western tradition in film and television."


Image

j'ose espérer que c'est pas pour sa contribution de fausse Indienne blanche dans "Broken Arrow" .. :lol:

sinon (c'est à savoir) dans les années 60, elle s'est mariée avec un neveu de la femme de Chiang Kai-shek..
EL
 

Re: dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar scripe » Mer 12 Oct 2011 18:35

Les Cahiers c'est pas un journal, mais un magazine anglais aujourd'hui, non ?

L'édito d'octobre :

Octobre 2011 - n°671 : Durer
par Stéphane Delorme

Il fut le réalisateur américain le plus désiré en 1979, et le plus détesté à partir de 1981. Tout se sera joué en une poignée d’années, entre deux films coupant sa vie en deux, deux chefs-d’œuvre, Voyage au bout de l’enfer et La Porte du paradis, enfer et paradis, pile et face du rêve américain. Trois films plus tard, puis un long silence courant jusqu’à aujourd’hui, il reste l’un des rares exemples de réalisateur totalement arrêté dans son élan. L’histoire du cinéma est l’histoire des vainqueurs, ceux qui ont su s’adapter à leur milieu, aussi difficile soit-il (et Fritz Lang, fêté ce mois-ci, en est un exemple royal). Mais il y a les autres qui n’ont pas eu, ou n’ont pas su trouver, les moyens de la conquête.

Michael Cimino reste aujourd’hui une légende. Cet homme secret a eu la générosité de recevoir les Cahiers du cinéma et nous le remercions chaleureusement. Jean-Baptiste Thoret, auteur du Cinéma américain des années 70 (éd. Cahiers du cinéma), était la personne idéale pour mener cette rencontre hors des sentiers battus. Cimino lui a proposé de faire la route ensemble pendant trois jours, de Los Angeles au Colorado. Cette aventure s’inscrit pour nous dans le geste plus large d’aller visiter les réalisateurs chez eux ou sur leur lieu de travail – que ce soit Lars von Trier dans ses studios Zentropa (n°669) ou Abel Ferrara dans la cave du restaurant de Little Italy où il a monté 4:44 Last Day On Earth (n°670). « Si vous voulez comprendre mes films, il faut que vous voyiez les paysages de mon Amérique. » Combien de cinéastes sentiraient cette nécessité ? Cimino n’a filmé qu’une chose, l’espace américain, et il l’a filmé partout, déplaçant ses westerns au Viêt-Nam, à Chinatown ou en Sicile. Il croit encore au « rêve américain » comme s’il était possible de faire du Ford à la fin du siècle, à une époque où le spectacle (qu’il aime) se réduit à la pyrotechnie, au lieu d’offrir la sublimation de l’histoire d’une nation. Cimino a contredit l’adage comme quoi « il y a toujours une seconde chance pour un Américain. » Pour lui, pas de deuxième chance, car l’Amérique ne se baigne pas deux fois dans le même fleuve.

Comment un réalisateur exigeant peut-il durer ? Comment construit-on une œuvre ? Ce numéro évoque les trajets de vie de deux réalisateurs légèrement plus jeunes que Cimino (né en 1939), Raoul Ruiz (en 1941) et Philippe Garrel (en 1948). Leurs parcours sont étrangement proches : un premier long en 1967-68 (Trois tristes tigres et Marie pour mémoire), puis l’exil à Paris pour le Chilien et l’exil dans l’underground pour Garrel, enfin la renaissance sur une scène plus large avec les sorties en 1983 des Trois couronnes du matelot et de L’Enfant secret. À partir de là, les deux cinéastes s’engagent dans un cinéma narratif plus ouvert au public, jusqu’à faire appel à des acteurs connus dans les années 90 (dont Deneuve de part et d’autre). Résultat : deux réalisateurs de films expérimentaux vus par une poignée d’illuminés dans les années 70 sont devenus deux piliers du cinéma d’auteur français dans les années 2000, jusqu’au triomphe des Mystères de Lisbonne et au superbe Un été brûlant. Magnifique exemple de ce que le système français et la conviction de quelques pirates alliés ont permis en matière de cinéma.

Que tirer de cette comparaison, même si les économies sont incomparables ? Les années 80 auront été la décennie de tous les dangers aux États-Unis, les studios devenant sourds aux ambitions des cinéastes ; l’inverse s’est passé en France, avec les renaissances publiques également de Jean-Luc Godard ou Manoel de Oliveira. L’industrie a eu la bêtise de se priver des réalisateurs qui pouvaient lui offrir des grands films. Résultat : le manque de respect pour les cinéastes, dont Ferrara témoignait encore le mois passé, a tué les studios. On peut toujours se dire : Scorsese et Coppola ont mangé leur pain noir et se sont refaits, Malick a ressuscité d’entre les morts. Pourquoi pas Cimino ? Cette inadaptation reste une énigme. La raison en est profonde : Cimino est foncièrement anachronique, il s’est trompé d’époque. Mais il a planté deux bornes telles dans le paysage américain que son nom reste inoubliable. Il a aussi posé quelques pierres autour. Cela fait une œuvre, et elle dure.


Je vous aurais demandé d'où ça vient, je suis sûr que vous m'auriez répondu : "ça c'est du Ciment, édito de Positif, obligé !" :lol:

La palme ,c'est ça : "Cimino n’a filmé qu’une chose, l’espace américain, et il l’a filmé partout, déplaçant ses westerns au Viêt-Nam, à Chinatown ou en Sicile. Il croit encore au « rêve américain » comme s’il était possible de faire du Ford à la fin du siècle, à une époque où le spectacle (qu’il aime) se réduit à la pyrotechnie, au lieu d’offrir la sublimation de l’histoire d’une nation." Comment on peut écrire ça sans avoir envie de casser sa plume ? En même temps tout le papier est d'une telle stupidité, vicié par les raccourcis, la paresse, le ton de midinette... les Cahiers c'est plus "le goût de l'Amérique", c'est carrément le culte de l'Amérique !
scripe
 

Re: dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar scripe » Lun 5 Déc 2011 15:45

Delorme de Décembre :

Autre fait notable, enfin, l’année a été très riche en disputes cinéphiliques. The Tree of Life gagne le pompon à ce petit jeu, mais il faut aussi citer Black Swan, Drive, Melancholia, qui ont suscité des débats animés jusque dans la rédaction des Cahiers. Gageons que ce mois de décembre livrera aussi son lot de disputes, avec le film archi-apocalyptique de Béla Tarr Le Cheval de Turin, que les thuriféraires zélés ne manqueront pas de défendre, la fable nain de jardin d’Aki Kaurismäki Le Havre, et le sérieux risible de Shame de Steve McQueen, portrait de l’artiste en DSK – autant de films qui auront les suffrages d’autres rédactions et feront débat sur Internet. Là ce n’est pas du chaos, mais de la dispute. Tant mieux.


On a l'impression qu'il oublie à la fin de rajouter : ", ça fait toujours marcher le commerce."

Apparemment ils préfèrent toujours les fables "figurines de Star Wars" à la fable "nain de jardin" de Kaurismäki... une année remplace l'autre, qui remplace la précédente, etc.
scripe
 

Re: dans les journaux anglais qui restent ouverts

Messagepar JM » Jeu 8 Déc 2011 17:12

JM a écrit:Bon, moi je me pose depuis un certain temps la question de savoir s'il était pertinent de la part de Malick de mettre dans la bouche de sa Pocahontas des vers arrangés d'Hölderlin. Il est des emprunts qui méritent d'être accueillis dans le doute et l'incertitude (et avec tout le respect que j'ai pour sa très grande érudition lol).. Je crois que c'est une question assez difficile, il faut que je me mette dans le livre d'Heidegger, "les hymnes de Hölderlin", entre autre.


Excellent, je viens de recevoir "Odes, Elegies, Hymnes" d'Hölderlin et "Les hymnes de Hölderlin : La Germanie et Le Rhin" d'Heidegger. Heureusement, il y a encore une ou deux personnes bien intentionnées qui pensent à moi (pléonasme) en France...

Au boulot!
JM
 

Suivante

Retourner vers l n'y a pas de porte...

cron